Dixon Lab | R C L R | Nutritional Science | S E B S | Rutgers

Updated April 4, 2014

Lipidomics Symposium was a success!  Thank you to our panel of Speakers!

Frontiers in Lipidomics - The Food, Nutrition and Health Connection

March 20, 2012 9 am-4 pm
Cook Campus Center, Rutgers University Cook Campus (Click Here! or go to http://ifnh.rutgers.edu/ for more information)

This symposium highlighted the use of mass spectrometry-based lipidomics to answer nutrition and health-related questions, and addressed the directions in which lipidomics will move in the next 5 years.

We are planning our Lipidomics Symposium for spring 2014!

 

Core Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Lipidomics Laboratory

What is the purpose of the LC/MS Core Laboratory?
The core is for the purpose of expanding the capabilities of each lipid laboratory in the Rutgers Center of Lipid Research (See Tab above to link to the RCLR site). Up until recently it was difficult to ionize lipids and therefore they could not be fully investigated using the mass spectrometer.  With the development of more efficient ionization sources, it is now possible to measure many more lipids and the diverse species within individual lipid classes.  Just like the Hubble space telescope has allowed us to "see" farther into the universe, the development of powerful mass spectrometers has allowed us to "see" more lipids than ever before.  Our Core is dedicated primarily to the identification and measurement of lipids and the different types of lipid species.

Check out our Latest Poster!

LCMS Projects Collage

Current Projects

Quantatitive Analysis of Diacylglycerols
Anita Brinker

The lab has developed a highly sensitive LCMS method for identifying and quantifying diacylglycerols (DAGs). This would allow investigators to use less total sample and be able to quantify DAGs down to 5 pg per injection on the column. Using the LCMS method investigators can not only easily quantify the total amount of DAGs but also determine the different species of fatty acid side chains in the DAGs. Currently the most common way to identify and quantify DAGs is to use TLC plating.  Our method has been validated and we presented a poster on the measurement of DAGs at the Eastern Analytical Symposium in 2007.
This page was last updated on Friday, April 4, 2014 6:56 pm